History

HISTORY FACULTY:

 Department Chairman - Bob Sybert

Bob Sybert - U.S. Government and Economics, AP U.S. Government and Economics, and Personal Finance
Andrew Howell - AP World History 
Brian Williams - U.S. History, AP U.S. History 1 and 2, and 8th Grade U.S. History
Charlie Turner - 7th Grade World History
Bandy Grace - 7th and 8th Grade History 
Judy Ingram - Mississippi Studies and Geography, and World History

 

Introduction:  If history/social studies is to be taught from a Christian perspective, the following concepts should be communicated to the students both directly and indirectly.  Obviously, there will be many biblical applications made throughout the history curriculum.  The following are some of the major and over-riding biblical principles that will be held before the students.

History is knowable - God is omniscient, knowing all things truly and exhaustively.  Man made in God’s image, can know things truly, but not exhaustively.  Furthermore, man’s nature as created by God is fixed and not subject to evolutionary alteration.  Therefore, based upon evidence, we can know and understand actions and motivations of those living before us.  God providentially allows for the preservation of documents and material evidence of past human experience.

History is meaningful and significant - God decreed the creation of space, time and human beings.  All acts done by human beings are done before God in God’s world and in God-created time.  Man can do meaningful things because, being created in God’s image, he imitates God’s creative activity.  Man can do good acts.  Man also, because of his fallen nature, rebels against God, thus he does things that are qualitatively evil.  Both good and evil actions have consequences in time as well as eternity.

History is linear - God has an overall purpose (decrees) and proximate goals (will) for His creation, including man.  God’s providence governs both man’s preservation and salvation.  Man is subject to God’s purposes.  Things change in space and time in ultimate subjection to his will.  History had a beginning with creation a key event with the life of Christ and will have a consummation with the return of Christ.

History is changing and showing development - God created peoples and cultures, and introduces historical change (e.g. exodus, resurrection, etc.)  Created in God’s image, man is creative; he manipulates and dominates his environment and rules other people.  On the other hand, man’s rebellion against God (the fall) brings decay and temporal judgments.  God as judge brings movement toward salvation and judgment.

History is tentative in interpretation - God is the great historian and the final judge.  Man’s judgments as to historical causation remain provisional and partial, and are based on man’s inherent rationality and insight into secondary causes (ideas, economics, climate, personalities, etc.), unless informed by direct revelation.  (For example, one might contrast our interpretation of the Israelite exodus with the causes of World War II.)

7th-12th Grade Curriculum

7th grade history is a study of the major themes in the history and culture of the world from the rise of Christianity and Islam to the modern era. The text is World History (3rd edition) published by BJU Press.

8th grade history is a complete survey of U.S. History from the time of the exploration and settlement to the present. The text is The American Republic published by BJU Press.

9th grade history is divided into two semester courses. One semester is a study of world geography.  This course provides a survey of major geographical concepts and includes a survey of the geography of each of the continents.  The text is Geography for Christian Schools published by BJU Press. One semester is Mississippi studies.  This course gives a survey of the geography, culture, and history of our state.  The text is Mississippi: The Magnolia State published by Clairmont Press.

Beginning in the 10th grade, students have the option of taking a grade level history course or an advanced level history course.  In general, to qualify for an advanced level course, a student had to have an A or B average in the previous year’s history and English courses, and have an achievement test score at or above the 75th percentile.  Exceptions to this policy can be requested.  Students who choose to take an advanced level course should do so because of an interest in the subject, and should be aware that the work load and skills required for success will be greater than in the regular history course.  

10th grade world history is a year long survey course that traces world history from the beginning of civilization to the modern era.  The text is World History published by Bob Jones University Press.

10th grade Advanced Placement World History is a course that has as its chronological framework the period from 8000 B.C. to the present, with the period from 8000 B.C. to 600 A.D. serving as the foundation for the remainder of the course.  A majority of the course will deal with the period between 600 A.D. and the present.  This course requires more reading and writing, analytical skills, and moves at a faster pace than the regular world history course.  In May the students will have the opportunity to take the A.P. World History Exam.  If they score high enough they have an opportunity to earn college credit.

11th grade United States History is a year long survey of United States History from the age of exploration and settlement to the present.  The text is U.S. History published by Prentice Hall.

11th grade United States History for Dual Credit is a year long survey of United States History from the age of exploration and settlement to the present.  This course is taking the place of Advanced Placement United States History which has been taught in previous years.  Students who pass this course receive 1 high school credit as well as 6 semester hours of college credit from William Carey University.  Since this is a college level course the reading and writing requirements will be much greater than in the regular United States History course.  This course will also move at a faster pace and will require more analytical skills than the regular United States History course.  The text is The American Pageant published by Houghton Mifflin.  Outside readings from other sources will also be assigned.

The regular 12th grade social studies curriculum is divided into two semester courses.  One semester is a study of American Government.  This course includes a study of the basic foundations of American Government, the political and electoral process, the three branches of the U.S. government, and a brief look at state and local governments.  The text for this course is Magruder’s American Government published by Prentice Hall.  The other semester is a study of economics.  This course includes a study of basic economic principles, the market economy, business and labor, the money and banking system, the government and the economy, and the global economy.  The text for this course is Economics:  Principles in Action published by Prentice Hall.

12th grade Advanced Placement United States Government is a year long course that covers the dilemmas of democracy, foundations of American government, linking people with government, institutions of government, civil liberties and civil rights, and making public policy.   This course requires more reading and writing, analytical skills, and moves at a faster pace than the regular 12th grade course.  In May the students will have the opportunity to take the A.P. U.S. Government Exam.  If they score high enough they have an opportunity to earn college credit. 
The text for this course is The Challenge of Democracy published by Houghton Mifflin.